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For the first time in the history of Australian sport, thousands of fans will have to dress up when SCG starts tomorrow in Sydney.

The announcement came as more Sydney suburbs were banned from the game or faced a $ 1000 fine.

Wentworthville and Belmore have been added to the growing list of suburbs that can’t join the crowd at the SCG as a group grows in western Sydney.

Fans in these stands tomorrow will have to wear masks, for the first time in the history of Australian sport.
Fans in these stands tomorrow will have to wear masks, for the first time in the history of Australian sport. (James Brickwood)

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said anyone who lives, works or has visited the suburbs below will not be able to attend the game.

  • Brown
  • Belmore
  • Berala
  • Birrong
  • Lidcombe North
  • Potts hill
  • Regent’s Park
  • Rookwood
  • Wentworthville

Masks will also be mandatory in the SCG during the test, except when eating or drinking.

The move comes after the MCG was named as a possible acquisition site following a positive case seen on the second day of the Boxing Day trial.

The Australian cricket test team practices at the SCG before testing in Sydney later this week.  Batter Will Pucovski and bowler Patt Cummins.
The Australian cricket test team practices at the SCG before testing in Sydney later this week. Batter Will Pucovski and bowler Patt Cummins. (James Brickwood)

“If you are in an Uber, if you are in a taxi, if you are in a bus, if you are in a queue, if you are in the SCG, at all times, you must wear a mask,” Mr. Hazzard said.

“Fines will be imposed on those who do not wear a mask in these circumstances.

“From the moment you actually get on the shuttle to get there, and get in line at the SCG’s front door, and go to your seat, and sit in your seat, you must wear a mask. The only exception to that is, if you are eating or drinking. “

People are advised to ride to the game in a car with a designated driver whenever possible to avoid large crowds on public transportation.

Those who use trains and buses to attend the game have also been asked to register their Opal card to assist contract trackers in the event of an outbreak or positive case.

An additional 450 bus and light rail services have been added to support the crowds expected to attend the cricket match.

Hazzard defended the state’s decision to continue with the event despite the possibility of an initial event.

“Simply saying, postpone the test, or cancel the test in New South Wales, would not be productive,” he said.

“You have to think about people’s mental health, the desire to go out and have aspects of a normal life, recreational aspects, sports, they all give us a feeling of well-being.

“Reports come to me about the sad results when people’s mental health suffers.”


www.9news.com.au

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