Sunday, June 20

Global economic partnerships are a ‘signal to the world’ about ‘who you can trust’


Sky News host Peta Credlin says global economic partnership arrangements are

Sky News host Peta Credlin says global economic partnership arrangements are “about more than trade” – they are “a signal to the wider world about who matters and who you trust”.

“As current chair of the G7, what Boris Johnson is really trying to do here is refashion the old Euro-centric, economics-focused G7, into something that’s global and geopolitically focused,” she said.

“He wants it to be the D10 – the ten major democracies: with Britain, the US, Germany, France, Japan, Italy, and Canada joined by Australia, South Korea, and India.

“If at some point the G7 can formally segue into the D10, that will be good for our standing in the wider world as well as a key signal to China that the democracies are taking a stand against regional bullying and unfair trade practices.”

Ms Credlin said this of course would not come without some awkwardness given China remains our biggest trading partner and also the greatest strategic challenge.

“This is where, as the emerging democratic superpower, India has such a big role to play. As a country that understands commerce and respects the rule of law, India could readily meet some of the supply chain challenges that losing China could bring,” she said.

“An important task for a prime minister with an increasingly deft grasp of diplomacy will be kickstarting the Australia-India free trade talks.”

Sky News host Peta Credlin says global economic partnership arrangements are “about more than trade” – they are “a signal to the wider world about who matters and who you trust”.

“As current chair of the G7, what Boris Johnson is really trying to do here is refashion the old Euro-centric, economics-focused G7, into something that’s global and geopolitically focused,” she said.

“He wants it to be the D10 – the ten major democracies: with Britain, the US, Germany, France, Japan, Italy, and Canada joined by Australia, South Korea, and India.

“If at some point the G7 can formally segue into the D10, that will be good for our standing in the wider world as well as a key signal to China that the democracies are taking a stand against regional bullying and unfair trade practices.”

Ms Credlin said this of course would not come without some awkwardness given China remains our biggest trading partner and also the greatest strategic challenge.

“This is where, as the emerging democratic superpower, India has such a big role to play. As a country that understands commerce and respects the rule of law, India could readily meet some of the supply chain challenges that losing China could bring,” she said.

“An important task for a prime minister with an increasingly deft grasp of diplomacy will be kickstarting the Australia-India free trade talks.”

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