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The 17th century was a time when it was not known what kind of products were good for people’s skin. The women were placed preparations of dubious conformation without knowing if their ingredients were harmful or not for their health. It’s what happened to queen elizabeth i, whose continued use of heavy metal-based makeup could have poisoned her to death.

Elizabeth I not only painted her face white for fashion but also to hide the marks of smallpox
Elizabeth I not only painted her face white for fashion but also to hide the marks of smallpox

Fashion during his reign dictated that women had to go with their faces painted white, since paleness meant youth and fertility, as well as a high social status. But the queen not only painted her face white for these reasons, but also because he had had smallpox and the rashes on his face had left marks on his skin.

to cover them up, Isabel resorted to the most popular makeup of the time: the white cherry from Venice. I used it day and night, continuously, because a sovereign with a young and healthy appearance was the proof for the court and the subjects that they were in the hands of a strong woman who could face even the worst of enemies.

The detail that nobody knew at that time was that the cherry white it was an excessively toxic makeup, capable of causing a slow death to those who use it. I was composed of lead carbonate treated with vinegar to which an egg white was added so that it adhered well to the skin. Furthermore, in most cases It also had traces of arsenic.

But the use of lead was not limited to the skin, but also to the eyes: Elizabeth I used a kohol eyeshadow -known since Ancient Egypt-, which was made with crushed galena powder with lead salts. On the other hand, to color her cheeks and lips she used carmine, a product that contained mercury.

Elizabeth I not only painted her face white for fashion but also to hide the marks of smallpox
Elizabeth I not only painted her face white for fashion but also to hide the marks of smallpox

Although the cause of Elizabeth I’s death is unknown, experts point out that the cocktail of these toxic beauty products could have killed her. The abuse of these lead materials began to show their toxicity: skin depigmentation, hair loss, dental alterations and blood poisoning and therefore, anemia.

His mental health was also affected by makeup: already in times close to his death in 1603 He suffered from alterations and a decrease in his levels of consciousness. The mercury in the lip gloss also wreaked havoc on her. Already towards the end experienced memory loss, depression, and irritability.

The day that Elizabeth II saw the ghost of Elizabeth I in Windsor

the travel site Visit Britain, revealed last November that both Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret claimed to have seen the ghost of Elizabeth I in Windsor Castle Library. This generated a wave of testimonies from people who ran into other specters of royals who have already died.

Photo of Windsor Castle in Windsor, England, on Dec. 25, 2021 (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
Photo of Windsor Castle in Windsor, England, on Dec. 25, 2021 (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

In accordance with what was also published by the media Daily Star, it is believed that the queen’s current residence is “haunted” and is inhabited by ghosts of former royals. The British newspaper maintains that there were 25 sightings of ghosts in the rooms of Windsor castle.

With respect to ghost of Elizabeth I, apparently, he usually wanders around the library wearing tacos and making them sound. In accordance with The Express, her footsteps are heard before she appears. Something that is creepy. quoted by the Daily Star, Richard Jones, author of the book Haunted Castles of Great Britain and Irelandsaid that too a castle guard had seen the ghosts of Queen Elizabeth I and George II in this room.


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