Saturday, July 31

The Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Launched For Frontline Workers Starting Monday


NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has announced that more than 35,000 frontline healthcare workers will receive the COVID-19 vaccine over the next three weeks.

“Since the vaccine has arrived … starting Monday, over the next three weeks, 35,000 front-line workers will be vaccinated in New South Wales,” said Ms Berejiklian.

The first cohort of people to be vaccinated will receive the prick at one of the state’s three vaccination centers, which are located at Westmead Hospital, Liverpool Hospital and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

Frontline workers, including nurses, will be among the first to receive the coronavirus vaccine in New South Wales.
Frontline workers, including nurses, will be among the first to receive the coronavirus vaccine in New South Wales. (Getty)

During the first three weeks, anyone who receives the vaccine will receive the Pfizer injection and therefore will need a second injection three weeks after the initial injection.

NSW Health Director Dr. Kerry Chant said quarantine workers and frontline healthcare workers will be the first to get the vaccine in NSW.

“Clearly, the priority for us is to protect our workers from coming into contact with COVID-19 patients day after day,” said Dr. Chant.

“We have a list of people who work in our quarantine system … then we will call those people to schedule appointments next week.”

Dr. Chant said contactees will receive a consent form to sign and will have the opportunity to ask questions about the vaccination process.

Doses of the Pfizer vaccine will be administered starting Monday.
Doses of the Pfizer vaccine will be administered starting Monday. (Getty)

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said the focus will remain on quarantine workers for the next three weeks, after which the vaccine will be released to other members of the public.

Berejiklian added that NSW aims to vaccinate most of the state’s quarantine workers as soon as possible.

“It doesn’t mean that none of them can catch the virus and spread it, so they all have to obey the strict rules we have, but it is an additional defense,” he said.

Berejiklian said she is “convinced” that most workers in the quarantine system would be willing to receive the vaccine.

“There would be enough people in that system who would be willing to raise their hands and say they want the vaccine that covers us for that system,” he said.

“I am convinced that the vast majority of people will be very excited.”

“I’d love to get mine early, but I don’t think it’s fair to skip the line … but if I could get it tomorrow, I would.”

NSW had no new cases of COVID-19 acquired locally for the 31st consecutive day.


www.9news.com.au

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